Do you know the five steps to washing your hands well?

Do you know the five steps to washing your hands well? Wash Those Germs Away, written by children’s songwriter Kathy Kampa, was inspired by the COVID-19 virus and a call to better hand washing by our school nurse. This song will teach you (and those you love!) how to to wash your hands thoroughly. Join friends from around the globe. Protect yourself from COVID-19 and other germs.

Here are some suggestions for teaching this song:

For young learners, check their knowledge of the different parts of their hands. Here are two ways to do this.

  1. First, let’s name each of the parts of the hand. You can say, Show me your fingers. Let’s say ‘fingers.’ Show me your thumbs. Let’s say ‘thumbs.’ Let’s count our fingers and our thumbs. 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10! Continue in the same way with the other parts of the hand. Show me your fingernails . . . palms . . . . wrists.
  2. Then, you can prompt the names of each part of the hand by showing: What are these? (wiggle your fingers) Fingers!

Now prepare soap and a towel or paper towel. Practice the song in your head and in your heart. Pretend to turn on the water.

Get started:
Turn on the water. Get the soap.
Rub your hands together. Let’s wash our hands.
Turn off the water.
Sing:
1. Wash between, wash between, wash between your fingers,  
Wash between, wash between, wash between your fingers.
2. Wash the back of each hand,
Wash those germs away!
3. (Start with your pinkie and work towards your thumb,
then start with your thumb to your pinkie
.)

Then wash your fingers one by one,
Wash each finger,
Wash your thumbs,
1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10, almost done!
4. (Bend your fingers to wash your fingernails in your palm.)
Now you wash your fingernails and wash your palms,     
wash your fingernails and wash your palms,
5. Wash your wrists, both right and left,
Wash those germs away!    
Wash those germs away!  
Wash  –  those  – germs  – away . . . . . . . . . YEAH!
Shake off that water and dry your hands.

Thanks to creative artists

—- Andre DiMuzio for arranging this song

—–Brady Foster for compiling all of the videos!

We want to make sure that everyone knows how to wash their hands well. We’ve made the regular version and the karaoke version available for free!

Wash Those Germs Away by Kathy Kampa

Karaoke Version

Wash Those Germs Away –Karaoke version by Kathy Kampa/ arranged by Andre DiMuzio

Thanks to Trudy Midas at Espana Silk for her support.

Thanks to everyone who joined in this hand washing compilation.

Wash your hands poster design with girl washing hands illustration

Thatcher Buck

Karoline Buck

Brady Foster

Yuzuho Fujisawa

Emma Hayashi

Maiko Hayashi

Barbara Hoskins-Sakamoto

Patrick Jackson

Kathy Kampa

Brooke Kearney

Lori Kampa Kearney

Shannon Kearney

Yoko Matsui

Dina Mitchell

Nao Oshima

Callie Sisel

Tomoko Tanaka

Christian Vilina

Chuck Vilina

Craig Wright

Special Thanks to Taruna Kapoor and students:

Kindergarten children:

Pushti Bhatti

Vihaan Singh

Pre-Nursery

Prince Rana

Arubhav Shishodia

Ranya Goel

Want to see some fun outtakes? Thanks to dogs Addie and Allie who joined in the fun! We also thank the pair of feet for trying to do this song.

For more kid-tested music and movement activities, check out more music on iTunes. Kathy has produced two music CDs for very young learners, Kathy Kampa’s Special Days and Holidays and Jump Jump Everyone, which build English language skills through movement while nurturing creativity and imagination! Grown and loved by real kids!

Songwriter Kathy Kampa is a passionate educator of young learners. She seeks to nurture children’s imaginations and spark creativity through fun and engaging activities. Kathy believes that music and movement should be a part of every young child’s education. Kathy’s Songs for Kids (Kathy Kampa’s Special Days and Holidays and Jump Jump Everyone) are available on iTunes and Magictimekids.com.

As a PYP (Primary Years Program) teacher in Tokyo, Japan, Kathy uses a globally-minded and inquiry-based approach to teaching through which students develop 21st century skills. She also supports the development of English language skills by creating songs, chants, and TPR/movement activities targeted to young learners’ needs.

Kathy and her husband Charles Vilina are also co-authors of Magic TimeEverybody Up, and the ELTon award-winning course Oxford Discover, all published by Oxford University Press.

#handwashing #COVID #coronavirus #washyourhands #socialdistancing #corona #handwash #KIDSMUSIC #CHILDRENSMUSIC #KATHYKAMPA #MAGICTIMEKIDS CHILDRENSSONGS #MOVEMENT #MUSICFORKIDS #KIDS #FAMILYMUSIC #MUSICCLASS #BABYMUSIC #TODDLERMUSIC #KIDSMUSICCLASS #preschool

Hand washing image Designed by brgfx / Freepik

Let’s Add a Little Music and Movement

If you’re looking for activities for young learners, check out my Facebook LIVE workshop. I teach children from age 2 – 12 in Tokyo, and these activities have all been LOVED in my classrooms. The activities support English language development as well as developmental body movement.
Today’s FB LIVE (February 21, 2019) included the following: It Is Raining (focus on body parts), Little Worms (vocal expression, yoga movement, building group unity), Come and Sit In Front of Me (transitional), Tiny Egg (Butterfly Life Cycle, creative movement, connection to Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar), Flitter Flutter Butterfly (pronunciation practice, rhyming sounds, movement), Here’s a Leaf (seed-leaf-bud-flower), Folding Scarves (transitional), Scarves Please (Transitional), We Love Hina Matsuri (song/canon for Japanese Girls’ Day), We Did It.  You can find all of the lyrics inside the CDs. 

If you like my music, it’s available on iTunes or https://www.etjbookservice.com/…/kathy-kampas-cds-4/

Materials for "Tiny Egg" chant

These are the materials used for the Tiny Egg chant (available on iTunes)

Kathy Kampa's Special Days and Holidays

 .     .  Children’s songs for special events for pre-school, kindergarten, and elementary students

Jump Jump Everyone

Jump! Turn into butterflies. Plant magical flowers!

Simple Strategies For Getting Attention

How do you get all of your students’ attention?  As we move to student-centered learning, your students may be more engaged in small group work. Throughout your lessons, however, you may need to get their attention again.  How do you do it?

First of all, with any strategy you use, you must practice it before you actually use it.  My students love to do this!  It’s easy to see how they continue to improve.

Secondly, the success of each strategy depends on you, your group of students, their age, and their disposition. Figure out what works best. In a couple months, change it up with a new strategy.

 1. Get attention with something that creates an interesting sound.

screen-shot-2017-03-06-at-9-29-03-pmWhat do you have readily available in your classroom?  One of the most interesting sounds I have in my classroom is a slide whistle.  If you have a big group of students, it quickly gets their attention.  Don’t have a slide whistle?  How about a tambourine or a kazoo?

(Check out West Music for interesting instruments.)

2.  Add a little rhythm to get attention.

Rhythm Clap (copyright © 2012 by Kathleen Kampa and Charles Vilina)

(Clap on every syllable. Students echo your clap.)

I   like    ba-na-nas.      (I   like    ba-na-nas.)

I   like   po-ta-toes.        (I   like   po-ta-toes.)

I   like   to-ma-toes.     (I   like   to-ma-toes.)

3.   How about trying some rhyming conversations?  These help your students develop phonemic awareness too!

My Grade One students love “Hands on Top.”Smiling boy posing in front of a wall

Teacher says,  Hands on top! (put your hands on top of your head)

Students answer, That means “Stop!” (students do the same)

One, Two, Three, Eyes on Me is another rhyming conversation.

The teacher sings, “One, two, three, eyes on me.”  (so-so, mi, so-so, mi)

Hold up fingers as if you’re counting to three.  Point to yourself.

The students answer, “One, two, eyes on you!”(so, mi, so-so, mi)

Hold up fingers as if you’re counting to two.  Students point to the teacher.

My students then do “Peace and Quiet” by putting two fingers in the air (peace) and one finger to their lips (quiet).

 4.  Butterflies 

I lovimages-1e to pretend with my students.  Ask, “Where are your butterfly wings?  What color are your wings today?”  Pretend to paint each arm by gently rubbing it and naming a color.                                                        i.e  This wing is pink, but this one is purple.

Raise and lower your arms out to your sides as if you are flying. Inhale and exhale.

5. Candles

Finally, inhale while raising your arms from your sides to above your head. Touch your hands together above your head, then bring them down in front of you.  Exhale when your hands are in front of your mouth.  This is an effective way to calm students after a lively activity.

Having some strategies in place will help your classes run smoothly.

27

How Can You Build English Throughout a Lesson? Use Transitional Songs, Part One

DotIn any children’s class, many activities are needed to keep students happy and motivated throughout the lesson.  Transitional songs are a perfect way to signal to children that one activity is ending and another is beginning.  A good transitional song also has other benefits:

  1. It supports the natural rhythm and intonation of the phrase or sentence you are using.
  2. The melody is quickly learned and recognized by students, so they move into action as soon as they hear it.
  3. In most cases, children can be encouraged to sing along, building group cohesion as well as productive language skills.
  4. Transitional songs soon become part of a classroom routine, giving students a sense of structure and making them feel secure during the lesson.

Today, for Part One, we present three transitional songs that help to make activities smooth and enjoyable for students. The lyrics for each of the transitional songs are included below with a simple recording.  A professional recording is now available on “Jump Jump Everyone.”

1.  Let’s Make a Circle

Many language activities work well with students seated (or standing) in a circle.  This transitional song quickly motivates children into forming a circle in the classroom.

Let’s Make a Circle  (copyright © 2012 by Kathleen Kampa and Charles Vilina)

(melody:  Skip to My Lou)

Let’s make a circle big and round.

Let’s make a circle big and round.

Let’s make a circle big and round.

Everybody please sit down. (or Let’s make a circle big and round to remain standing)

2.  Come and Sit in Front of Me

This transitional song works well when you want students to sit as a group in front of you, perhaps for a storytelling session.

Come and Sit in Front of Me  (copyright © 2012 by Kathleen Kampa and Charles Vilina)

(melody:  Muffin Man)

Come and sit in front of me,

In front of me, in front of me,

Come and sit in front of me,

In front of me.

3.  Cards, Please!

Many activities involve the use of picture cards for language support. After the activity is over, this transitional song gets the picture cards back to you quickly and efficiently.

The song is sung as a dialogue between the teacher and students.  The word cards can also be changed to any other item that needs to be collected (papers, crayons, etc.)

Cards, Please!  (copyright © 2012 by Kathleen Kampa and Charles Vilina)

(melody:  Skip to My Lou)

T: Cards please.   Ss: Here you are.

T: Cards please.   Ss: Here you are.

T: Cards please.   Ss: Here you are.

All: Thank you very much!

You can sing these transitional songs in your classroom.  The songs are also professionally recorded here on “Jump Jump Everyone.”  Check out the link on iTunes .

Mimi CD cover 2015-10-12 at 1.04.43 AM

This album has lots of movement songs which are important for young learners growth and development.  Contact Englishbooks.jp or me (magictimekids@gmail.com) to order CDs.